Struggling with the Cursed Writer’s Block?

Believe it or not, but everyone has it at some stage of their writing career. Especially to me – sometimes things get in the way of life when I can’t focus on anything in my story writing, then I go check for cute animal pictures as a distraction. Let me tell you a few things that helped me through the stages of writer’s block.

First of all – Your path

Now I’m a writer who has to have a plan for their story. If not, then it ends up dead before it began. If you’re like me who needs to have this path set out for them then I strongly recommend for you to stop and read over your work. One of the major things about my block is because something is missing in the story or I could perhaps extend a part for another character that I forgot to include three chapters ago. So if your path is going in the direction of destruction and you don’t like it – cut it out and do it again. I know this is a painful process, but there’s still a chance you can reuse the deleted part for a future scene.

Inspiration 

Have you ever been in a place or heard a song that simply spoke to you? You could be inside a nice bar and an idea starts to merge in your head. Commonly, many writers get inspiration from their dreams. Ideas are born through inspiration and by watching or listening to the world around us, we can get bring life to an idea that has been dormant for so long. Most of my scenes are brought on by music, so perhaps if you’re struggling even with the music you have currently then you look up for something refreshing. I work best with instrumental music, as sometimes I’m listening too deeply with the words and I may accidentally write the lyrics instead of my intended part. So, my advice for inspiration is to go outside to take a break from your writing in order to get a better feel of new ideas.

Looking from a Different Point of View

Sometimes, even I admit that this is a little challenging. When I offer my work to read, there are plenty of people who care about me who are willing to sell their arm to do so in a heartbeat. The problem lies within your bond with other readers however. If the story isn’t good and readers are just saying that it is then it’s tough to be able to work from it. Yet if there’s honesty and it’s bad, then the critique can embarrass you and shy you away from the chance. I won’t deny it – it is hard to give your work to someone and get feedback, but my advice would be for you to ask the reader of what they think needs to happen. It is however, completely up to you whether you take their advice of the story as you have the final say.

Writing Small Projects

I know that not many people are a fan of changing topic so suddenly… which is why I included it as a small project. A perfect example would be a possible snippet of your story that has nothing to do with the main plot (A.K.A – fanfiction involving your characters). While I rely on this from time to time, this isn’t my most used tactic. I often do alternate scenarios or side stories of the characters I never use. It is a skill that I often enjoy and sometimes it brings me back to my story which is something that we all need sometimes.

~ Annalise

Annalise is the author of the Sacred Stone books

Visit Annalise’s bio here

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My 10 Step Novel Writing Process

In my opinion the most important thing for an author is to have a consistent project process. This process is likely to be different between each author. This month I thought I might share my process.

Step 1: Idea Formation

Before you can start writing a story of any kind, you need to at least have an idea for what you’re writing. Formulating the ideas after first having them and working out if the ideas are viable enough to turn into a story. I often find that my ideas come from dreams. I then spend time the next day going over the ideas and stretching them until they become something more. Once I have worked out if they might work as story ideas then I move onto the next step.

Step 2: Research

After formulating my ideas into a novel/series idea I begin researching the topic and start building the scene for it. If the project is set in a specific time period, this means I need to research the time period, the way people dressed, the way they talked and the various social statuses involved with the time period. Through this research characters can be made and worlds created.

1_rdhhfkls-0l0xuzighwyzgStep 3: Storyboarding

After researching, I start storyboarding my ideas. Formulating a basic storyline for the novel at the very least. I am not much of a planner so I usually only start with a story premise and a few milestones. Everything else I leave up to in-the-moment creativity.

Step 4: 1st Draft – The Skeleton

This is the very first basic draft of the story. I do my best to make sure the general story gets down onto the paper. It doesn’t need to have fantastic character and story development as it is only me shovelling sand into the sandpit. I aim to have this draft at approximately 80,000 words which is more than what I expect my novel’s final word count to be. The word count is likely to fluctuate as the writing process continues.

Step 5: 2nd Draft – Major Storyline Rework

I usually leave the project for a few months before returning for this step. For the 2nd draft I completely rewrite the story, this time with the original draft on the same screen. Using the original draft I rework the entire novel and restructure the storyline to a point where the major plot points are better developed.

157195302Step 6: 3rd Draft – Minor Storyline Rework

Again I leave a bit of time between these two steps. Maybe a month though as we are only focusing on the minor points of the story and making sure the characters are well developed. This process usually takes three times reading through the entire novel to ensure everything is as it should be for the story to either tie up the loose ends and be over or to be tied up enough to be over but also loose enough to continue into the sequel. After this step is finally complete, congratulations you have a finished manuscript… But wait… you still have to edit it.

Step 7: 4th Draft – My Edit

Leaving the manuscript for a while is the best way to ensure you come at it with a somewhat fresh perspective. A fresh perspective is fairly important as otherwise it is difficult to spot grammatical mistakes. I am awful at spotting mistakes in my own work. But going over it yourself first is a good idea, that way you have at least tried to find the more obvious mistakes. Besides there are other people who are more than capable of editing your manuscript for you.

download (4)Step 8: 5th Draft – Editor’s Edit

So, you’ve now written your manuscript and have gone over it with editing in mind. Now it’s time to hand it over to a professional editor. I was lucky enough that I had already found Ouroborus Books by this point with The Stray so I was able to get Sabrina to edit my book as part of my publishing costs. But if you haven’t found your publisher yet this can be a bit more difficult. Have a look around your local area and even online for editors of your genre. You can expect to pay several hundred dollars for an 80,000 word manuscript. But it is worth the money if you plan to self-publish. It might not get rid of all the errors, but it will definitely get an objective point of view and the editor will do their best to make sure your story is the best it can be.

Step 9: Final Draft

Usually after you get your manuscript back from the editor, it will be a marked-up version. This means they have gone through and made all kinds of notes, whether using the Microsoft Office Suite or pen to paper. It is now your job to go through the mark-up and make the changes. Most them will just be an instant yes to change. Others however may ask you to rephrase things or explain something better, more information. Either way, if you have any questions, follow up with your editor and they should be more than happy to explain their intentions. For this I recommend having an editor that uses track changes in Microsoft Word, otherwise the pen and paper mark-up is such a gruelling process and not one I look forward to.

Step 10: Prepare for Publication

After the entire editing process is done, it’s time to prepare your manuscript for publishing. If you have a publisher, they will complete this process for you. However, if you are self-publishing this can include cover design, manuscript formatting for different platforms, design choices, promotional items and events. Social media advertising. Pretty much everything you can think of that will help you sell your book. You want to be in everybody’s faces, but not to the point where your notifications get turned off.

~Amanda

Amanda is the author of the White Wolf Trilogy

Visit Amanda’s bio here

Ouroborus Authors’ Roundtable Review of 2018

As the calendar closes on the eleventh year of Ouroborus Book Services, we take a look back on the year that was. There were ups and downs – professional, personal and creative – and some really big moments – debut book launches, new team members, new directions, even an engagement! Our goal to keep our blog consistent and regular was met (go team!) and we conquered two Supanovas. Best of all, we added FIVE NEW BOOKS to our range. It’s been our biggest year yet, but don’t think we’re slowing down now. Keep reading: we sat down together to reflect and get excited about all the things we’ve got coming in 2019!

What was the highlight of 2018 for you as an author?

Danica: It was the first time in almost ten years that I wrote anything about Arya. She’s the main character in my second book, Colours Within. But every book I’ve started writing since I was younger, she has been a main role, not always leading character but she has always been present. I was starting to get to attached and fixated on her that I haven’t been able to write her an ending because I don’t know what my ending is, for some reason I feel like the two endings are tied together, linked.

Josh: The highlight for me (which happened today) is when an author overseas is going to check out my book!!!

Mitchell: For me it was finishing two books. One that took five years to write and releasing my first young adult horror book.

Sabrina: Releasing my first solo novel. Although I have two cowritten books, releasing Blank was a great sense of achievement. I don’t get to work on my own books as much as I’d like to because I’m getting everyone else’s books ready to publish, so it was my pride and joy this year.

Shayla: Writing again. I didn’t publish, because I’m working on my PhD, but as a result I’ve left full-time work and it’s given me my Sunday and holiday writing time back. This was the highlight for me as an author.

How did 2018 change you?

Sabrina: I think I became more stubborn. A lot of trying stuff happened but I refuse to let it beat me.

Mitchell: It started off as a bad year but got better. I learnt things can go from bad to good in the space of a few weeks.

Who released a new book with Ouroborus in 2018? (and tell us a little about that experience!)

Annalise: I finally released my first book, Reflection of Fire, or RoF for short. The night itself wasn’t what I was expecting, especially since I sprained my ankle after tripping over a step. While I don’t think of it as special as the remainder of my stories have yet to be released, my new experience would be reminding myself that I’ll always be on the quest to write something afterwards.

Rob: The Spinning Sister, follow up to The Laughing Man is my real sink or swim. The success or failure of this will inform the rest of the series.

Mitchell: Skellington Key was released. Looks great. Lots of positive feedback.

What goals do you have for 2019?

Josh: To have a majority or all of book 2 written.

Shayla: Book 4. Plus, you know, the other 80 things on my plate. But book 4!

Danica: I want to have first drafts completed for all my unfinished works. Until then I won’t start any more new ideas.

Annalise: I need to finally finish Pride of the Light, the last instalment of the series and go back to editing Eye of the Storm. Also to build up the hashtag for Shifter Squad!

New Years’ Resolutions?

Mitchell: Write more books.

Sabrina: Yes, more books! I’d like to get the sequel to Blank at least written and the final book in the Everdark Trilogy. Apart from that, aim for happiness.

Antonia: My new year resolution is to walk as much as I write. For example, if I write 1,000 words I will need to walk 1km. One metre will be one word I put down on paper. This is a good new year resolution for me because I need to improve my fitness and increase how many words I write in a day.

Best book you read in 2018?

Josh: The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken.

Shayla: Geekerella by Ashley Poston or Illuminae by Jay Kristoff and Amie Kaufman.

Mitchell: Tranny by Laura Jana Grace.

Rob: I can narrow it down to a series. The Murderbot Diaries. Giving a killer robot social anxiety? I mean what’s not to love?

What TV show, book series, game, hobby or idea did you spend the most time obsessing over in 2018?

Annalise: This is tough. This year was actually the year where I didn’t pick up any shows that I would obsess over. The Originals and New Girl finished, Lucifer and Brooklyn Nine Nine were cancelled for what seemed like for an eternity only to be revived. I guess I would have to say Smash Brothers Ultimate for my obsession. I’ve been actively avoiding spoilers which is hard by the way.

Josh: The TV show I obsessed over is The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.

Mitchell: Titans, or Making a Murderer.

Shayla: My year can be cleanly cut into three phases of televisual obsession – Battlestar Galactica at the start, then The 100 once I recovered from Starbuck and Apollo, and most recently Killjoys. So it was a space-themed year… much like every year.

Advice you wish someone had given you in 2017 for dealing with 2018.

Rob: It’s going to be a tough one. Take every opportunity offered, because they’ll make the bad things worth it.

Shayla: It’ll be okay. You’re making the right decision.

When alien archaeologists arrive on sun-scorched future Earth and dig up an ancient copy of your book and tell each other in hushed, reverent voices, “It dates back to 2018!” what inferences or assumptions will they make about our society in their reports?

Sabrina: Oh dear… that will not be good. Blank is dystopian fiction and doesn’t show humans in the best light. But it will also show that love can win.

Rob: That we let our imagination carry us away to greater things. That the world that is and can be wasn’t always enough to explain how we feel.

Important question: what was the best thing you cooked or ate in 2018?

Annalise: Caramelised pork and anything chip themed. No regrets.

Antonia: Thai green curry with pork because the spices helped to clear up my sinuses. For the majority of 2018, I was battling a virus that just wouldn’t go away unless I overloaded my body with spicy food and chilli.

Sabrina: I’ve had heaps of yummy food this year. The dinner I ate at Sky Tower in Auckland was pretty amazing. I had some great gyoza at a tiny Japanese restaurant near my house, plus bacon, banana and maple pancakes and tomato soup ramen in Wellington.

SO HAVE A HAPPY HOLIDAY, WHATEVER YOU CELEBRATE, FROM THE OUROBORUS TEAM!

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amanda     mel-clarke-208x300

Sabrina , Shayla , Mitchell , Danica , Robert, Annalise , Josh (J.J.) , Antonia, Amanda and Mel

Not All Who Wander Are Lost

I’ve just gotten back from a magical three weeks in Europe on the cusp of winter, and as soon as I finish this blog post and all my photos finish downloading off my phone, I’m switching off all other applications and opening my book draft. Sorry in advance for the short post.

I want to talk a little about the ways, both positive and negative, that travelling affects and influences my writing practices. While there are uncountable ways in which seeing the world opens my eyes to new experiences, other ways of doing things, exotic places and unexpected points of view for me to explore in my stories, it is also a simple fact that three weeks wandering the world is three weeks not working directly on the book. Some writers can write anywhere. They use beautiful notebooks, curl up in cafes and parks in stunning cities and let their pens flow. As much as I romanticise this idea and collect notebooks for this exact purpose, it doesn’t happen, because in flow-state I write too long, too fast and too intensively for my hand to keep up with my mind. I need a PC. I need a desk and my own space. I need my music and my drafting documents, which are on my PC, which is on my desk, in my own space.

47688195_2047288622031528_5060002057767878656_nSo a holiday from my life is also a holiday from my hobby. I think in a couple of ways this is a good thing. In one respect, I can’t feel guilty about wasting time not working on my book, because I physically can’t work on it. It’s out of my hands. All I can do is be in the moment of where I am, enjoying my holiday all the more, and spend my dull times – in transit or in lines, so many lines… – with my stories in my imagination, where I can’t write through my ideas but have to let them ruminate and reshape. This gives me more time to consider alternatives and how this could impact the storyline and my characters before I get home to write it down.

As mentioned above, a big way in which travelling affects my writing is indirectly through me. Travel changes a person. You see other ways of living, you see poverty, you see extravagant wealth, you see beauty in art and horror in battle-scarred churches. You fall in love with languages you’d not heard before and feel desperately vulnerable in cities where you thought you’d feel safe. You learn about historic poor choices and how these have echoed through time and been commemorated in monuments and rituals. You wonder how the world could ever have let these things happen and realise they’re not so different from what goes on today. Travel shows you patterns of human experience, similarities and difference all at once, and as a result you grow. It comes through in your writing as you mature and increasingly desire to explore these complicated elements of humanity. In my Elm Stone Saga, readers will have noticed the shift of focus from schoolgirl concerns in the first book to more political and ethical matters as the series progresses. This isn’t something I set out to do; just the natural process of a maturing author using my story world as a medium to explore the issues I’m exposed to in my own experience.

Travel also provides new settings. I fell hard for Prague the first time I visited the Czech Republic three years ago, and it found its way into the final scene of Unbidden. Years earlier, the first city I visited outside of Australia and New Zealand was Paris, and though I was sick and jetlagged and sixteen, I was enamoured of the tall narrow apartment we stayed in, with its tiny retrofitted one-person elevator and antique iron staircase railing and the uneven flooring and the narrow, cobbled street it was on. When I started writing Chosen just a couple of months later, it was this picture that came to mind when writing Emmanuelle’s Parisian home. Her scenes were later cut out or trimmed to make way for Aristea and Renatus’s storyline, but it was the place that provided the authentic details to that flash of inspiration.

The human brain is incredible but flawed, and it can’t keep all the data it processes in its repositories. It has to cull, and specifics of place and experience are lost. How the buildings don’t quite line up, all built at different times with no standardisation, and the bicycle chained up out front has a twisted front wheel from being run over and still isn’t claimed after three days. How the rain drips through the hop on/hop off bus’s canvas roof for so long that a wave pool is generated at your feet by the movement of the vehicle and the headphone jack sparks a little so you opt to go without audio guide this time. How the wintry sun reflects off distant snow-capped hills or how the first view of Rome from the Palatine Hill took your breath away.

Because I can’t not write at all, and because I have all those notebooks I can’t write my stories in, I keep a travel journal for all those little details of place and experience. What I saw, heard, smelt, felt; my impressions, my associations, what I expected and what I learned. I keep the habit of diary-writing while I’m away to help organise my thoughts but also to give myself something to read later that isn’t Wikipedia or TripAdvisor. It’s hard to flesh out a place you’ve never visited – a challenge I accidentally gave myself when I first cast all my original Elm Stone settings. In future I want the descriptions to come from my own experience, to mirror what I saw and knew there, and I have several times pulled my journal off the shelf (it lives next to my home copy of Unbidden) to revisit my words from Prague. You can’t get that personal research from staying at home and working on the book, unfortunately, so while three weeks wandering the world is three weeks not working directly on the book, it is certainly not three weeks lost.

~ Shayla

Shayla is the author of the Elm Stone Saga

Visit Shayla’s bio here

Creation Evolution

Often people want to know how I get my ideas for books, or how I put them together with a few rough ideas. For this blog, I’ll tell you how my latest book came together.

I was listening to a true crime podcast and they were investigating a crime that happened 30 years prior. They hired cadaver dogs to search a forest in order to smell for human remains. On the way home I was thinking about the person who trains the dogs and if you were a serial killer, would you want those bodies to be found? I knew from other podcasts that sometimes the killers return to the bodies. If this person and their dog kept finding your bodies, would you be angry? I then thought, what if this person receives a letter in the mail, no stamp, no return address and it just says: “Stop finding my bodies.”

This was the initial start of a book idea.

In my last book I had created a detective I called Merlin Drake. He wasn’t a nice guy, but I liked his character. I thought I could explore his background more and make him a main character. I liked the fact that in the TV show Mr Mercedes, you got to know who the killer was in the first episode, rather than have to guess and it be revealed at the end. So, I figured I would introduce the killer very early on. Although this isn’t enough to write a book, there was a lot there to work with. I researched cadaver dogs and I wanted the trainer to be a woman who no longer did it, but still had the dogs. I skipped chapter one, and just left the heading, and moved to chapter two and introduced the dog trainer. I named her Bernadette Lawson, and her dog’s name was Breeze. Bernadette, or Ernie, lives out on her own and has a troubled past like Merlin.

So, what now? I figured she would say no to helping with her dog, as she had retired, but she likes helping others and giving families closure, so she agrees. I’ve written gore before, but I mostly write young adult fiction, so this would be a chance to really stretch my writing legs. I planned on bringing the reader in a few chapters with characters and introduce the small town; then, I would write a very graphic, detailed chapter that would make your stomach turn, then back to the nice chapters. I wanted to lure the reader in, then when they could barely stand it, bring them back.

A lot of the initial writing will start if I have a good name for the book. So, I was at the Ekka this year when we went and watched the wood choppers. I really like the book name ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ and the meaning behind it, so I was looking for a name similar. After the woodchopping competition the announcer said something about the last generation of woodchoppers, and I remember thinking ‘The Last of the Woodchoppers.’ It’s a book name that’s interesting and not really related to anything until you read the book. I tried to keep it in my memory bank all day until I got home. Then I was lying in bed trying to remember it. I woke up mumbling ‘woodcutters,’ and went back to sleep. In the morning I woke thinking, what was the name again? Last of the Woodcutters? So that became the name of the book. I made the town have an old wood mill and that would be the place of the first murder.

I got excited about writing the serial killer. Mostly because I’d never done it and as a writer, it was something that would be challenging and fun (in a weird way). It wasn’t the book I intended to write next, but the chapters just started flowing out. I looked at all the side characters that had to be there to move the story along, for example other police officers, and thought I could examine those more. The Sheriff, who didn’t have a huge role, suddenly became very interesting. His father, I had decided, used to work at the mill and has a few secrets that he has kept his whole life.

I normally think of how a book will end and make that the flag I am heading for. For this one, without giving too much away, I thought of it straight away. Then, as the book started to take shape, I thought of an epilogue that may open it up for a sequel. I had been reading an address somewhere and misread it as ‘The Letterbox Fields.’ I thought that would be a perfect name for the second book. It’s now about 25,000 words. I have the next five chapters planned out and I’m aiming to have it done by early next year. If this all sounds weird, it probably is. The more you write, the more that muscle expands and opens up, allowing ideas to form and connect. Scary place.

~Mitchell

Mitchell is the author of Skellington Key, Heather Cassidy and the Magnificent Mr Harlow, and the Everdark Realms Trilogy

Visit Mitchell’s bio here

How to Start Writing

I’m going to start with what is, in my opinion, one of the most important quotes about writing.

“The worst thing you ever wrote is better than the best thing you never wrote.”

It’s a fact of life that the hardest part of being a writer isn’t planning, it isn’t even writers block or finishing. The hardest part is the starts: you have to start every stage, and gather up that motivation over and over and over.

This makes ‘how to start writing’ one of the questions I get asked pretty often.

Now I’m not talking about how to write words, that’s a matter of sitting down and pumping words out. This is about how to start on a project. That novel you’ve got in you.

So here’s what you need to get started.

Put Judgement Away

This is one of those things that’s both that simple and that hard. Judging yourself is the enemy of every writer, from the first timer to the seasoned professional. Some people can make a career of writing and still never get over it with each and every new story. The problem is that judgement is a vital tool, it’s how we ensure that we do our best work, but the fact is that the start of a story isn’t the time or place for it. This is the time and place where you get things done.

Start your work free of judgement, free of the fear that you aren’t good enough, because even if you aren’t right now you will be by the time the job is done. You can always come back and fix those problems in editing. There are several stages of rewriting and fixing where judgement can enter a little more into your process but in the early days you need to open yourself up to new ideas, not to lock them away.

The Right Amount of Preparation.

The right amount of preparation for a story is a question that’s hard to answer and mostly depends on the kind of person and writer you are. Some of us like to write out our outlines, characters and motivations, where others just throw their characters into the situation and let the story unfold as it may.

Chances are if you’re having trouble getting started and you currently have a document full of ideas and details then you’re the first type. If you’re the second type you’re ready now, I hereby give you permission to stop worrying and just do the thing. It’ll be fine.

For those of us who need to prepare, the trick is having enough preparation to get the work done, but recognise that there’s a limit to how much prep you can do before the work begins and you can always prepare more as you go. Go forth from a position of strength, not paranoia.

The best rule of thumb I can give is that if you can say that you know the plot, characters and setting pretty well that’s well enough for you to begin.

The Perfect First Sentence/Paragraph/Chapter

Does Not Exist.

It’s as simple as that. You cannot write the greatest first part of all time, and agonising over making something perfect before you move on means you’ll never move on. Settle for good, even settle for ok for now. There are several more stages where you can fix what’s wrong.

Get Excited!

You’re doing something awesome and remembering that is vital to the starting process. You’re doing something awesome and so often the start of writing seem like a chore. It’s important to remember that this is something you want to do. This is a good, exciting thing! So talk to your friends about it, think about or even work on the fun parts. Imagine the sense of accomplishment you’re going to get when the job’s done.

Writing is a labour of love, so remember to love it!

Go Back to Step 1

Yep. I’m sorry to say it but once you’ve done this and written the story you have to go all the way back and start a rewrite, then to plot edit, then to detail edit, each time with a little more room to get it right.

Don’t worry, after every start you get to enjoy the fun parts. It’s a good process with a satisfying ending and room to grow your craft and work. Every time you need to start you can come back here. Do your prep, stop judging yourself, get excited and go for it!

 

For those who’ve started all right but are having trouble getting to the end check out ‘The Fine Art of Finishing’ on the Ouroboros blog.

~Robert

Robert is the author of the Laughing Man Chronicles

Visit Robert’s bio here

Emily David’s Interview Notebook – 3 October 2018

Emily David’s Interview Notebook – 3 October 2018

PRE-INTERVIEW NOTES:

Full name: Zac Hall

Age: 16

Appearance: Black unkempt hair. Light brown eyes. Lightly tanned skin.

Book:  The White Wolf Trilogy – The Stray

 

First impressions: Overall, Zac seems somewhat curious and nervous as to why I have requested to interview him but at the same time, he acts oblivious to the fact that he has a book written about him. Maybe he does not know? Oooh, plot twist!

Things to remember about the book: Woof woof a.k.a man’s best friend.

Note to self: Try not to make many werewolf jokes 😛

 

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT:

EMILY: So Zac, how would you describe yourself?

ZAC: I don’t usually get the chance to introduce myself, being from a small town, everybody already knows me. And I’m usually with my father if I meet anyone new so he introduces me.

EMILY: Well, you are doing quite well so far. You seem very polite. Do you have any allergies, diseases, or any other physical weaknesses?

ZAC: I had a peanut allergy when I was little but I grew out of it. I still kind of avoid them though, just in case.

EMILY: *Note to self: check if Zac carries any silver. Are werewolves allergic to silver??*

EMILY: Are you right- or left-handed?

ZAC: Right handed though I sometimes practice with my left hand so that I could use it if needed.

EMILY: *Note to self: hmmm… I wonder if he is a werewolf?*

EMILY: You have a unique voice but for our readers, how would you describe your voice?

ZAC: My voice is deep but sometimes squeaks in response to human puberty.

EMILY: What do you currently have in your pockets?

ZAC: Wallet, keys and phone. Was I supposed to have anything else?

EMILY: *Note to self: Zac’s keys might be silver? Maybe he isn’t a werewolf?*

EMILY: What is your favourite and least favourite climate?

ZAC: I always liked spring best. My town always looks so pretty with the trees and forests so full of life.

EMILY: Do you have any quirks, strange mannerisms, annoying habits, or other defining characteristics?

ZAC: I’m often told that I run my hands through my hair when I’m nervous. I also always arrive late to important things.

EMILY: *Note to self: Zac’s hair currently looks unruly.*

EMILY: Who is your role model? Do you aspire to be like anyone?

ZAC: I don’t really have a role model but I do want to be drafted for a college soccer team when I graduate. Hopefully I can play through college and then be picked up by a team after that.

EMILY: What sound or noise do you love?

ZAC: I always loved the purring of content cats. It’s so soothing, when Dylan’s cat sits next to me and purrs.

EMILY: *Note to self: don’t make howling noises, resist the urge.*

EMILY: What sound or noise do you hate?

ZAC: I absolutely hate the sound of Styrofoam rubbing on something. Like pulling it out of a cardboard box and it makes that squeaking noise.

EMILY: What is your spirit animal? And why this animal?

ZAC: I thought it would be like a border collie, they’re always so happy and ready for anything.

EMILY: What is the most embarrassing thing ever to happen to you?

ZAC: I think it was that one time I slipped over on my way out of the showers in the locker room after gym. My towel fell off and the whole class laughed at me.

Is that all your questions? Because I really need to get back home.

EMILY: Yeah, that’s it, Zac. Thank you for your time.

 

POST INTERVIEW NOTES:

Overall, Zac really has no idea he has a book written about him and I am still not sure if he is a werewolf or not. This remains a mystery.

 

~~~~

 

This has been a fictional interaction between Emily David, a journalist intern who writes for Mystic magazine from the upcoming novella by Antonia Bryan and Zac Hall from The White Wolf Trilogy – The Stray by Amanda Geisler.

To find out more about Zac Hall, get your hands on a copy of The Stray today!

 

~Antonia